libera-l:

americas-liberty:

conservativerevolution:

libera-l:

Thought this was relevent

This couldn’t be less relevant. I’d say it was a poor parallel, but it’s more like a non-existent parallel. Which is beside the point that you nicely assumed that all conservatives are male. And your subject/verb agreement needs fixing. And your point is either non-existent, poorly stated or just plain silly. Go reread some of the liberal logic 101 posts and try again. 

OP forgets that the southerners during the Civil War were Democrats and the Northerners were Republicans. So if we draw this along today’s political lines we get the Republicans defeating the Democrats. lol

OP does remember that the political parties essentially flip flopped around the late 1800’s, as I do actually understand basic U.S. History. However, at the time the South (which, yes, was Democratic) was still conservative, as they were generally against abolition and promoted conservative ideas and policies.
However, the point of this argument isn’t to draw parallels between the political parties of the Civil War. It’s simply saying that  the conservatives of today who want to secede from the U.S. (the “keep fantasizing about Civil War II) should refresh their memories on what happened during the actual Civil War… i.e. the state that seceded were pummeled.

The Republican party was founded in 1854, before the Civil War, by anti-slavery activists… So you’re flip-flop argument is a bit premature. The party was founded almost exclusively on anti-slavery rhetoric. Both parties were “conservative” by today’s standards, but just about everything was back then. But enough of that.
If point is to draw comparisons from then and now on the basis of secession, then that is flawed too. The southerners (Democrats lol) actually had good reason to want to break away from the US. In many ways the 10th amendment was being trampled over by the federal government over many issues, not just slavery. There were factories, ports, railroads, military assets as well as other things that were purposely built or placed in the north which essentially rendered the south powerless economically and politically. The slavery issue was just the spark that ignited a powder keg.
As for the southerners getting “pummeled”, they actually won most major engagements with the north for the first year to 18 months. They almost captured Lincoln and the White House early on which prompted Lincoln to frantically search for new military leadership as well as recall most of the military from the western territories. After the north halted the south’s charge northward, the south were in for a long fight which left many of their leadership either dead or captured. As good as Robert E. Lee was (and he was very good. he was offered command of the entire northern military by Lincoln, but refused to fight his fellow Virginians) he couldn’t do much without a chain of command and competent officers. The rest is history as they say.
As for today’s “secession movement”, it is just a way for disgruntled citizens to voice their frustration and concerns. I really doubt most of the people that signed the petitions actually fantasize about the Civil War or even want to really leave the union. They simply want it to be known that they do not agree with federal policies. It’s an act of civil disobedience… it’s “for show.” Nothing will come of those petitions and they know that. To say they want war is to miss the point of their argument.
Quick note: Ulysses S. Grant, hero of the Civil War for the north, was a Republican too. Some of his writings suggest he didn’t care if slaves were freed or not. Later, as president, he persecuted the KKK (started and run by Democrats), pushed civil rights legislation, peace with the indians and supported voters rights. He was a walking contradiction in many ways.
Sorry I got off on tangents, I really love history. lol

libera-l:

americas-liberty:

conservativerevolution:

libera-l:

Thought this was relevent

This couldn’t be less relevant. I’d say it was a poor parallel, but it’s more like a non-existent parallel. Which is beside the point that you nicely assumed that all conservatives are male. And your subject/verb agreement needs fixing. And your point is either non-existent, poorly stated or just plain silly. Go reread some of the liberal logic 101 posts and try again. 

OP forgets that the southerners during the Civil War were Democrats and the Northerners were Republicans. So if we draw this along today’s political lines we get the Republicans defeating the Democrats. lol

OP does remember that the political parties essentially flip flopped around the late 1800’s, as I do actually understand basic U.S. History. However, at the time the South (which, yes, was Democratic) was still conservative, as they were generally against abolition and promoted conservative ideas and policies.

However, the point of this argument isn’t to draw parallels between the political parties of the Civil War. It’s simply saying that  the conservatives of today who want to secede from the U.S. (the “keep fantasizing about Civil War II) should refresh their memories on what happened during the actual Civil War… i.e. the state that seceded were pummeled.

The Republican party was founded in 1854, before the Civil War, by anti-slavery activists… So you’re flip-flop argument is a bit premature. The party was founded almost exclusively on anti-slavery rhetoric. Both parties were “conservative” by today’s standards, but just about everything was back then. But enough of that.

If point is to draw comparisons from then and now on the basis of secession, then that is flawed too. The southerners (Democrats lol) actually had good reason to want to break away from the US. In many ways the 10th amendment was being trampled over by the federal government over many issues, not just slavery. There were factories, ports, railroads, military assets as well as other things that were purposely built or placed in the north which essentially rendered the south powerless economically and politically. The slavery issue was just the spark that ignited a powder keg.

As for the southerners getting “pummeled”, they actually won most major engagements with the north for the first year to 18 months. They almost captured Lincoln and the White House early on which prompted Lincoln to frantically search for new military leadership as well as recall most of the military from the western territories. After the north halted the south’s charge northward, the south were in for a long fight which left many of their leadership either dead or captured. As good as Robert E. Lee was (and he was very good. he was offered command of the entire northern military by Lincoln, but refused to fight his fellow Virginians) he couldn’t do much without a chain of command and competent officers. The rest is history as they say.

As for today’s “secession movement”, it is just a way for disgruntled citizens to voice their frustration and concerns. I really doubt most of the people that signed the petitions actually fantasize about the Civil War or even want to really leave the union. They simply want it to be known that they do not agree with federal policies. It’s an act of civil disobedience… it’s “for show.” Nothing will come of those petitions and they know that. To say they want war is to miss the point of their argument.

Quick note: Ulysses S. Grant, hero of the Civil War for the north, was a Republican too. Some of his writings suggest he didn’t care if slaves were freed or not. Later, as president, he persecuted the KKK (started and run by Democrats), pushed civil rights legislation, peace with the indians and supported voters rights. He was a walking contradiction in many ways.

Sorry I got off on tangents, I really love history. lol

(via to-theleft)

Brooklyn - Green-Wood Cemetery: Battle Hill - Soldiers’ Monument

The Battle of Long Island, which was fought on this spot in late August 1776, was the first for the Continental Army following the Declaration of Independence some seven weeks prior. During the engagement, 2,000 American troops under General William Stirling battled General James Grant’s British force, which was three times larger. Much of the fighting occurred across this ridge—hence the name Battle Hill. It is said that atop this hill a group of American riflemen were surrounded, shot and buried where they fell. Battle Hill is the highest natural point in Brooklyn, 216 feet above sea level.
The Soldiers’ Monument was erected in 1869, just four years after the end of the civil war, it commemorates the New Yorkers who served the Union during the Civil War. The monument honors the 148,000 New York men who fought “in aid of the war for the preservation of the Union and the Constitution.” It is curious that this monument, located in Brooklyn, remembers the men of New York, since New York at the time meant Manhattan. Although situated outside New York City, Green-Wood was considered an appropriate place for citywide monuments. The grim and realistic reliefs that grace the column depict the pain and agony of warfare. Surrounding the monument are four life-size soldiers.

Brooklyn - Green-Wood Cemetery: Battle Hill - Soldiers’ Monument

The Battle of Long Island, which was fought on this spot in late August 1776, was the first for the Continental Army following the Declaration of Independence some seven weeks prior. During the engagement, 2,000 American troops under General William Stirling battled General James Grant’s British force, which was three times larger. Much of the fighting occurred across this ridge—hence the name Battle Hill. It is said that atop this hill a group of American riflemen were surrounded, shot and buried where they fell. Battle Hill is the highest natural point in Brooklyn, 216 feet above sea level.

The Soldiers’ Monument was erected in 1869, just four years after the end of the civil war, it commemorates the New Yorkers who served the Union during the Civil War. The monument honors the 148,000 New York men who fought “in aid of the war for the preservation of the Union and the Constitution.” It is curious that this monument, located in Brooklyn, remembers the men of New York, since New York at the time meant Manhattan. Although situated outside New York City, Green-Wood was considered an appropriate place for citywide monuments. The grim and realistic reliefs that grace the column depict the pain and agony of warfare. Surrounding the monument are four life-size soldiers.

It’s 2012. People still think the Civil War was about slavery.

communismkills:

How?

Sadly, it’s probably the revisionist history that gets pawned off on children in school.

The Civil War is not the War of Southern Independence, it’s the War of Northern Aggression.

communismkills:

Get it right!

HERE HERE!

I had to say something :D

I had to say something :D